Bookish Features

Waiting on Wednesday – January 30, 2019

Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Breaking the Spine in which we share a book that we are eagerly anticipating!

The Ruin of Kings by Jenn Lyons

The Ruin of King

From Goodreads:

There are the old stories. And then there’s what actually happens.

Kihrin is a bastard orphan who grew upon storybook tales of long-lost princes and grand quests. When he is claimed against his will as the long-lost son of a treasonous prince, Kihrin finds that being a long-lost prince isn’t what the storybooks promised.

Far from living the dream, Kihrin finds himself practically a prisoner, at the mercy of his new family’s power plays and ambitions. He also discovers that the storybooks have lied about a lot of other things things, too: dragons, demons, gods, prophecies, true love, and how the hero always wins.

Then again, maybe he’s not the hero, for Kihrin isn’t destined to save the empire.

He’s destined to destroy it . . .

Uniting the worldbuilding of a Brandon Sanderson with the storytelling verve of a Patrick Rothfuss, debut author Jenn Lyons delivers an entirely new and captivating fantasy epic. Prepare to meet the genre’s next star.

I received this ARC from NetGalley. The premise looks extremely interesting and right up my alley!

Bookish Features

Top Ten Tuesday: The Ten Most Recent Additions to My To-Read List

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. I decided to post the first five books based upon actual length. However, the last five novels are books that felt like they took me forever to finish.

1. The City of Brass, S.A. Chakraborty

2. The Last Namsara, Kristen Ciccarelli

3. Once a King, Erin Summerill

4. Furyborn, Claire Legrand

5.  Skyward, Brandon Sanderson

6. Fire and Heist, Sarah Beth Durst

7. The Wicker King, K. Ancrum

8. The Storm Crow, Kalyn Josephson

9. The Light Between Worlds, Laura E. Weymouth

10. Fire & Blood, George R.R. Martin

Bookish Features

First Lines Friday – January 25, 2018

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature hosted by Wandering Words. The meme is based on the idea that instead of judging a book by its cover, author, prestige, we judge it instead by its opening line(s). The book I picked today is one that contains a highly  important message, especially with everything we see in YA books these days being. You can check out my review of the book here!

GOLD.

Symbol Au.

Atomic number 79.

Dictionary definition: “a yellow malleable ductile metalic element.”

You could say my family was obsessed with it. For my mother’s fortieth birthday, my father commissioned a grand piano with 24-karat gold keys. The entire piano is covered in gold leaf and is the tackiest instrument ever played. He tried to smash it with a hammer after she disappeared, but my oldest brother talked him out of it. So he satisfied himself with sealing the double doors of the music room shut.


ABOUT THE BOOK

Fire and Heist

Title: Fire and Heist
Author: Sarah Beth Durst
Rating: ★★★★

In Sky Hawkins’s family, leading your first heist is a major milestone–even more so than learning to talk, walk, or do long division. It’s a chance to gain power and acceptance within your family, and within society. But stealing your first treasure can be complicated, especially when you’re a wyvern–a human capable of turning into a dragon.

Embarking on a life of crime is never easy, and Sky discovers secrets about her mother, who recently went missing, the real reason her boyfriend broke up with her, and a valuable jewel that could restore her family’s wealth and rank in their community.

With a handpicked crew by her side, Sky knows she has everything she needs to complete her first heist, and get her boyfriend and mother back in the process. But then she uncovers a dark truth about were-dragon society–a truth more valuable and dangerous than gold or jewels could ever be.

Bookish Features

Waiting on Wednesday – January 22, 2019

Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Breaking the Spine in which we share a book that we are eagerly anticipating!

King of Scars by Leigh Bardugo

King of Scars

From Goodreads:

Nikolai Lantsov has always had a gift for the impossible. No one knows what he endured in his country’s bloody civil war—and he intends to keep it that way. Now, as enemies gather at his weakened borders, the young king must find a way to refill Ravka’s coffers, forge new alliances, and stop a rising threat to the once-great Grisha Army.

Yet with every day a dark magic within him grows stronger, threatening to destroy all he has built. With the help of a young monk and a legendary Grisha Squaller, Nikolai will journey to the places in Ravka where the deepest magic survives to vanquish the terrible legacy inside him. He will risk everything to save his country and himself. But some secrets aren’t meant to stay buried—and some wounds aren’t meant to heal.

War…YES! I love that it takes in the same world as our beloved Grisha Trilogy.

Bookish Features

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Meant to Read In 2018 but Didn’t Get To

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. I decided to post the first five books based upon actual length. However, the last five novels are books that felt like they took me forever to finish.

1. To Kill A Kingdom, Alexandra Christo

2. Sky in the Deep, Adrienne Young

3. Seafire, Natalie C. Parker

4. Mirage, Somaiya Daud

5.  These Rebel Waves, Sara Raasch

6. For a Muse of Fire, Heidi Heilig

7. The Hazel Wood, Melissa Albert

8. Muse of Nightmares, Laini Taylor

9. Circe, Madeline Miller

10. The Wren Hunt, Mary Watson

Bookish Features

First Lines Friday – January 18, 2018

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature hosted by Wandering Words. The meme is based on the idea that instead of judging a book by its cover, author, prestige, we judge it instead by its opening line(s). The book I picked today is one that contains a highly  important message, especially with everything we see in YA books these days being. You can check out my review of the book here!

The first thing I learned as a hunter was how to hide. There was a skill in disappearing in the trees like the wind and merging into the river like stones, masquerading yourself as something you weren’t was what kept you alive in the end. Most humans didn’t think the masquerade was as important as the kill, and most humans ended up paying for it with their lifeblood.


ABOUT THE BOOK

An Anonymous Girl

Title: An Anonymous Girl
Author: Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen
Rating: ★★★★★

Seeking women ages 18–32 to participate in a study on ethics and morality. Generous compensation. Anonymity guaranteed. 

When Jessica Farris signs up for a psychology study conducted by the mysterious Dr. Shields, she thinks all she’ll have to do is answer a few questions, collect her money, and leave. But as the questions grow more and more intense and invasive and the sessions become outings where Jess is told what to wear and how to act, she begins to feel as though Dr. Shields may know what she’s thinking…and what she’s hiding. As Jess’s paranoia grows, it becomes clear that she can no longer trust what in her life is real, and what is one of Dr. Shields’ manipulative experiments. Caught in a web of deceit and jealousy, Jess quickly learns that some obsessions can be deadly.