Book Reviews

[BLOG TOUR & Q&A] Night of the Dragon (Shadow of the Fox, #3) by Julie Kagawa

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Welcome to my stop on the Night of the Dragon book tour! Thank you to Inkyard Press for organizing the tour and allowing me to participate as a tour stop!


ABOUT THE BOOK

Night of the Dragon

Title: NIGHT OF THE DRAGON
Author: Julie Kagawa
Pub. Date: March 31, 2020
Publisher: Inkyard Press
Genre: Young Adult Legends, Myths, Fables, Young Adult Paranormal, Occult & Supernatural, Young Adult Fantasy
Find it: GoodreadsAmazonB&N, IndieBoundBooks-A-MillionAppleBooksGoogle Play

All is lost.

To save everyone she loves from imminent death, kitsune shapeshifter Yumeko gave up the final piece of the Scroll of a Thousand Prayers. Now she and her ragtag band of companions must make one desperate final effort to stop the Master of Demons from using the scroll to call the Great Kami Dragon and make the wish that will plunge the empire into chaos.

Shadow clan assassin Kage Tatsumi has regained control of his body and agreed to a true deal with the devil—the demon inside him, Hakaimono. They will share his body and work with Yumeko to stop a madman, and to separate Hakaimono from Tatsumi and the cursed sword that trapped the demon for nearly a millennium.

But even with their combined skills and powers, this unlikely team of heroes knows the forces of evil may be impossible to overcome. And there is another player in the battle for the scroll, a player who has been watching, waiting for the right moment to pull strings that no one even realized existed…until now.


REVIEW

For whatever reason, this novel tugged at my heart strings. I knew how everything was going to turnout, but putting myself in Yumeko’s shoes, dang, I’m not sure how I’d be able to accomplish what she is. I love her! She is such a great dynamic character, her growth from the first novel to the last was so significant and she is so pure of heart, full of doubt, and hopeful that you can’t help but like her.

Next…the supporting characters who are super supportive and selfless, but also main characters. The story just wouldn’t be the same without them. Usually, there are multiple characters I dislike, but man, Tatsumi (*heart eyes*), Daisuke, Okame, Reika, and Suki are all such good friends. They all have their own personalities, but are willing to risk it all for the better of Iwagoto.

The magic system intertwined within Iwagoto is unique in of itself. The Japanese mythology woven throughout the trilogy is refreshing and animating. I find myself wanting to look more into the history. Now I know where Eevee and Ninetails came from!

What I didn’t like was the predictability of the story. While I liked the outcome, I like a little suspense. One thing I didn’t find believable was the demons being “good” or turned off by the protagonists. I don’t think demons would react that way. However, none of this ruined the plot by any means.

“you’ll know it’s me because our souls will recognize each other”

Night of the Dragon is a tale of friendship, love, and the power of good. Readers who like a story where the good guys win and the bad get what they deserve will love this novel.

See my review for Shadow of the Fox here.
See my review for Soul of the Sword here.

★★★★


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Julie Kagawa_Hires2017 (1)

Julie Kagawa, the New York Times bestselling author of the Iron Fey, Blood of Eden, Talon, and Shadow of the Fox series was born in Sacramento, California. But nothing exciting really happened to her there. So, at the age of nine she and her family moved to Hawaii, which she soon discovered was inhabited by large carnivorous insects, colonies of house geckos, and frequent hurricanes. She spent much of her time in the ocean, when she wasn’t getting chased out of it by reef sharks, jellyfish, and the odd eel.

When not swimming for her life, Julie immersed herself in books, often to the chagrin of her schoolteachers, who would find she hid novels behind her Math textbooks during class. Her love of reading led her to pen some very dark and gruesome stories, complete with colored illustrations, to shock her hapless teachers. The gory tales faded with time, but the passion for writing remained, long after she graduated and was supposed to get a real job.

To pay the rent, Julie worked in different bookstores over the years, but discovered the managers frowned upon her reading the books she was supposed to be shelving. So she turned to her other passion: training animals. She worked as a professional dogtrainer for several years, dodging Chihuahua bites and overly enthusiastic Labradors, until her first book sold and she stopped training to write full time.

Julie now lives in North Carolina with her husband, two obnoxious cats, and a pair of Australian Shepherds that have more Instagram followers than she does.

Follow Julie:
Website| FaceBookInstagram | Twitter| Goodreads


Q&A

Q: What was the hardest scene to write? What was the easiest?
A:  The hardest scene was the last battle with the Final Boss at the end.  Without giving away spoilers, there was a lot of kitsune magic, illusion and misdirection, and trying to show everything that was going on without making it too confusing was a challenge.  I don’t remember an easy scene to write, but I did enjoy writing one of the final chapters (where I hope everyone cries).  

Q: Did you hide any secrets in your book? (names of friends, little jokes, references to things only some people will get)
A: There are a few references that only those very familiar with Japanese folklore would get.  For example, the names of the Reika’s two dogs, Chu and Ko, come from a Japanese novel called The Eight Dog Chronicles, which has been adapted into manga, anime, and even video games.  In Soul of the Sword, Yumeko and her friends are on their way to the home of the tengu, when they encounter a pair of magical stone guardians called Yoshitsune and Benkei, two real life historical figures that inspired countless legends and stories.  In folklore, Minamoto no Yoshitsune was a near mythical swordsman who had been trained by the king of the tengu, and Benki was a warrior monk who was his stalwart companion. 

 

Q: What do you hope people remember about Night of the Dragon?
A: I hope people come away with a new appreciation of Japanese myth and folklore, particularly all the wonderfully bizarre yokai, yurei and bakemono that populate these stories.  From kitsune and tanuki to oni and kirin, I hope it inspires readers to learn more about the world of Japanese myth and legend. And I hope people remember how much they cried at the end of the story. 

 

Q: What is your dream cast for Night of the Dragon?
A:  I am so bad at this question.  I really can’t answer it because one: I am terrible at keeping up with current actors/actresses.  And two: I see everyone in Shadow of the Fox as anime characters.

 

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